Descriptions of Courses for Live Lectures

Description of Casey’s Live Lectures

Casey Hein is pleased to provide live, evidence-based continuing education courses, not only for oral healthcare providers (i.e., dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants) but customized courses about aspects of oral health which are particularly relevant to non-dental healthcare providers (i.e., physicians, nurses, and allied healthcare professionals). Casey also presents a course specifically designed to assist educators in undergraduate and graduate schools of health science universities who are tasked with assimilating an oral health curriculum into medicine, nursing, pharmacy, etc., and/or integrating models for interprofessional education.

For organizations or private study clubs that are not approved as providers of accredited continuing DENTAL education, Casey Hein & Associates, an Approved PACE Program Provider, is pleased to provide accreditation through offering a jointly hosted program.

Customization of Courses

Casey will customize programs for individual organizations by working alongside directors and meeting planners to determine the specific needs of the target audiences, and optimize promotional strategies. Most courses include presentation of real life case studies to stimulate critical thinking. Pre-course exercises, “Case Vignettes,” which are designed to stimulate the critical thinking skills of course participants, are posted at www.caseyhein.com. Course participants have often commented that reviewing the case vignettes prior to the program has enriched the learning environment. Meeting planners are urged to include information about the pre-course exercises in promotional materials.

Courses Listing

The list of courses which follow below will give meeting planners an overview of programs Casey has provided in the past. Please note: the courses are divided into two separate categories: 1) courses for dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants & dental staff; 2) courses for all healthcare providers; and 3) oral health courses particularly relevant to physicians, nurses, and allied healthcare providers. If you ‘click’ on the ‘+’ sign to the left of the title of the course, additional information about each course will appear.

Courses for Dentists, Dental Hygienists, Dental Assistants & Dental Staff

These courses have been well received by entire staffs and they are perfect for team development days.

Addressing the Systemic Impact of Periodontal Disease by Building Collaboration with Physician, Nursing and the Allied Healthcare Communities (5-6 hours)

Audience: Dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, business staff
Length of program: 5-6 hours

Scientific investigation conducted over several recent decades has provided compelling evidence that periodontal disease may increase the risk for a number of inflammatory driven disease states, including coronary artery disease and stroke, complications of diabetes, adverse pregnancy outcomes, respiratory conditions, and complications of chronic kidney disease, among others. Nondental healthcare practitioners such as physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, and others, have an important role to play in prevention, screening, and appropriate referral of patients at risk for periodontal disease. And, dentists and dental hygienists are well positioned to counsel patients in such things as the prevention of cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, and other chronic diseases, and screen and appropriately refer at risk patients. This type of collaboration allows for bi-lateral point-of-care screening and referral which offers great promise in health promotion and disease management of some of the most prevalent and life threatening diseases. Through presentation of real life case studies, this course will expand participants’ appreciation of the significance of periodontal disease, challenge participants to incorporate evidence of periodontal-systemic interrelationships into clinical protocols, and provide a template for jump-starting interprofessional collaboration in this area of patient care.

After attending this course, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the biological mechanisms implicated in the inflammatory pathway linking periodontal disease to systemic consequences, such as increased risk for cardiovascular diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes, in addition to complications of diabetes, and other links under investigation.
  2. Discuss the role of oral healthcare providers in ensuring oral-systemic health, including progressive diagnosis of periodontal disease and things to consider regarding treatment in general practice or referral to periodontist.
  3. Screen patients for systemic diseases/conditions, or patients at risk for systemic diseases/conditions.
  4. Articulate scientifically founded key messages that need to be communicated to patients about oral-systemic interrelationships.
  5. Implement strategies to increase awareness of the importance of oral health within the greater healthcare community, and initiate medical-dental collaboration.
  6. Reflect on the way we currently practice: Case study
Re-Defining Our Role in Ensuring Periodontal-Systemic Health (5-6 hours with working lunch)

Length of program: 5-6 hours (with working lunch)
Audience: Dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, business staff

The emerging evidence of periodontal-systemic relationships has now reached a tipping point which can no longer be ignored, and integrating credible findings of this research into clinical dentistry and dental hygiene can no longer be considered optional. Today we recognize that sustained inflammation is the driving force behind most chronic diseases/conditions, and that diseases are usually not caused by a single bacterial exposure. Rather, chronic disease states are the result of multiple bacterial exposures/episodes, like periodontal disease, over time. The question becomes, how much does periodontal disease contribute to the risk for inflammatory driven disease states such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and other life threatening diseases and conditions? And, what is the role of dentists and dental hygienists in assessing individual patients risk for inflammatory driven disease states such as these?

Morning Session (3 hours): An overview of the most current research on the theorized biological mechanisms linking periodontal disease to systemic diseases. At the end of the morning, audience will be presented with case studies (fictitious) which have been designed to stimulate thinking on how to critically evaluate patients for periodontal disease and other factors which place them at increased risk for systemic diseases and conditions, and recommend treatment or refer, as appropriate.

Working Lunch (1 hour): Audience is divided into working groups to discuss case studies, and the role of individual members of the dental team, in optimal case management.

Afternoon Session (2 hours): Using case based learning format, individual groups will present their findings of the various case studies which challenge participants to rethink how their patients are evaluated for periodontal disease. This course helps the dental team reframe the “check-up” and “cleaning” appointment.

After attending this course, participants should be able to:

  • Provide an overview of the theorized biological mechanisms implicated in the inflammatory pathway linking periodontal disease to systemic consequences.
  • Explore the role of oral healthcare providers (i.e., dentists and dental hygienists) in progressive intervention of periodontal disease and screening for inflammatory driven disease states.
  • Implement effective patient education program regarding periodontal-systemic links.
  • Discuss which cases might benefit from referral to dental specialists and/or physician.
Preventive Cardiology in Dentistry (3-4 hours)
Length of program: 3-4 hours
<strong.Audience: Dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, business staff

This course empowers oral healthcare professionals to incorporate the latest evidence on the relationship of periodontal and cardiovascular disease, screen patients to identify those who may be at risk for cardiovascular disease, and build collaborative relationships with nondental healthcare providers to increase point-of-care screening and cross referral of patients at risk for cardiovascular disease and periodontal disease.

After attending this course, participants should be able to:

  1. Recognize the significance of cumulative inflammatory burden.
  2. Discuss the relationship between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis and periodontal disease as a modifiable risk factor for heart disease and ischemic stroke.
  3. Accurately articulate the risk periodontal disease may pose in the development and progression of atherosclerosis.
  4. Identify patients at risk for cardiovascular disease.
  5. Articulate key messages for educating patients about the relationship between periodontal disease and CVD.
  6. Implement strategies for medical-dental collaboration in caring for patients at risk for periodontal disease and atherosclerosis.
  7. Articulate the findings of various consensus opinions related to clinical application of evidence of the association between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis.
  8. Reflect on the way we currently practice: Case study
A Best Practice Approach to Target Diabetes in Dental Patients (3-4 hours)
Length of program: 3-4 hours
Audience: Dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, business staff

This long overdue course blends a compelling vision for the very important role of dentists and dental hygienists in screening for diabetes, pre-diabetes, obesity, and Metabolic Syndrome with practical case-based learning. Course participants will learn how to screen patients for obesity, pre-diabetes and diabetes in the dental setting, and customize treatment plans for patients with diabetes.

After attending this course, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the epidemic trends in the prevalence of diabetes.
  2. Discuss the biological link between diabetes and periodontal disease.
  3. Discuss the importance of monitoring glycemic control (blood sugar) in dental patients with diabetes or pre-diabetes.
  4. Communicate scientifically founded messages to patients about the interrelationship between diabetes and periodontal disease.
  5. Implement bi-lateral point-of-care screening and referral of patients at risk for diabetes and periodontal disease (medical-dental collaboration).
  6. Document important information associated with the status of a patient’s glycemic control and diabetes case management.
  7. Recognize oral complaints and findings which may indicate impaired immune response in diabetes.
  8. Consult with a patient’s physician regarding diabetes case management when necessary.
  9. Develop an integrated treatment plan customized according to patients’ individual diabetes status and glycemic control.
  10. Recognize a hypoglycemic event during dental treatment and appropriately respond to t
  11. Reflect on the way we currently practice: Case study
The Intersection of Obesity and Periodontal Disease: A New Model for Risk Assessment of Dental Patients (3-4 hours)
Length of program: 3-4 hours
Audience: Dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, business staff

Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is a leading cause of death for people who are obese. Over the last five years, multiple investigations suggest that MetS, also referred to as the insulin resistance syndrome, is positively associated with periodontal disease. Emerging evidence proposes that the severity and extent of periodontal disease is significantly higher among patients with MetS compared to those without; that periodontal disease is associated with MetS independent of other risk factors; and periodontal therapy may benefit individuals affected with both MetS and advanced periodontal disease.

Roughly one-third of US adults have MetS. Overlaying this statistic onto the typical general dental practice of 1,500 patients, this equates to 500 people within one dental practice, who may have this condition. This places a multitude of patients at greater risk for periodontal disease in addition to a myriad of inflammatory driven chronic diseases and conditions, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In view of the magnitude of this epidemic and the gravity of the consequences of MetS, oral health practitioners must become proficient in identifying patients at risk for this condition, and co-managing their cases.

During the first part of this program, an overview of the evidence supporting the relationship between MetS and periodontal disease, and the concept of ‘inflammation priming’ and ‘inflammatory loading’ will be presented. During the second session, participants will be presented with case studies that are designed to stimulate thinking on how to reframe the dental care of patients at risk for MetS.

After attending this course, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the concept of the cumulative inflammatory burden.
  2. Define the criteria that suggest a person has MetS.
  3. Provide an overview of the theorized biological mechanisms implicated in the inflammatory pathway linking adiposity to periodontal disease.
  4. Differentiate dental patients with central adiposity from those with peripheral adiposity.
  5. Educate patients about the impact of overweight and obesity on periodontal health.
  6. Identify at risk patients who might benefit from referral to physicians and specialists outside of dentistry.
Targeting Obesity in Dental Patients (3-4 hours)
Length of Program: 3-4 hours
Audience: Dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, business staff

This case-based course focuses on empowering oral healthcare professionals to incorporate the latest evidence on the relationship between obesity, periodontal disease. “Obesity is such a strong predictor of co-morbidity- it can no longer be ignored in everyday care of dental patients.”

After attending this course, participants should be able to:

  1. Discuss the magnitude of the obesity epidemic.
  2. Discuss evidence supporting a relationship between obesity, metabolic syndrome, and periodontal disease.
  3. Implement protocols to screen dental patients for overweight and obesity.
  4. Integrate into clinical dentistry new ideas on obesity prevention defined by authoritative bodies.
  5. Reflect on the way we currently practice: Case study
The Threat of Periodontal Disease in Pregnancy (3 hours)
Length of Program: 3 hours
Audience: Dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, business staff

This case-based course focuses on empowering oral healthcare professionals to incorporate the latest evidence on the relationship between periodontal disease and risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

After attending this course, participants should be able to:

  1. Discuss the significance of preterm birth and fetal growth restriction.
  2. Discuss evidence supporting a relationship between periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes.
  3. Articulate the significance of infection and inflammation during pregnancy.
  4. Articulate the risk periodontal disease may pose to healthy pregnancy.
  5. Define oral healthcare providers’ role in preventing complications of pregnancy.
  6. Articulate the findings of various consensus opinions related to the oral health care of pregnant women.
  7. Reflect on the way we currently practice: Case study

 

Courses for All Healthcare Providers

A Patient Centric, Interprofessional Approach to Caring for Patients with Diabetes & Periodontal Disease (3 hours)
Length of Program: 3 hours
Audience: All healthcare providers & business staff
Pre-requisite knowledge or training: none

This course offers valuable insights from information gathered during a special interprofessional focus group which explored nondental healthcare practitioners’ awareness of oral-systemic interrelationships, and the potential for clinical application at the University of Manitoba. The group was comprised of an obstetrician, two nurses, a dietician, two dentists, and a dental hygienist, all of whom provided excellent insight into the obstacles related to knowledge translation of a growing body of evidence that suggests periodontal disease may increase the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes. The feedback of the experts who participated in the focus group also validated many assumptions previously held about how little is taught about oral health in non-dental healthcare practitioner curricula, and the voids that currently exist relative to applying evidence of oral-systemic relationships in the medical care of at risk patients. Experts were also very interested in learning about this periodontal-systemic relationship, eager to discuss the challenges associated with clinical application and highly forthcoming by proposing strategies that might bridge the gap between knowing and doing.

This presentation is enhanced by video footage of the interactions of the focus group participants, and valuable insights on barriers that limit knowledge-to-action in this arena of healthcare and how they may be dismantled.

Upon completion of this course participants should be more comfortable with interprofessional collaboration in the care of women who are pregnant who may have periodontal disease.

The Vision and Development of a Novel Curriculum in Oral Health for Inclusion in the Education of Nondental Healthcare Providers (2-3 hours)
(Initiative of the Colleges of Dentistry & Medicine at the University of Manitoba)
Length of Program: 2-3 hours
Audience: Educators in undergraduate and graduate schools of health science universities who are tasked with assimilating an oral health curriculum into medicine, nursing, pharmacy, etc., and/or integrating models for interprofessional education

The vision for the University of Manitoba’s specialized curriculum, Oral-Systemic Health Education for Nondental Healthcare Providers, was largely inspired by the growing appreciation of the need to address patient care systemically and holistically, and compelling evidence of the significance of the interrelationships between oral and systemic health. Subsequently, there have been calls for curriculum reform in undergraduate education of nondental healthcare providers to include oral-systemic health as a foundational base of knowledge in the interprofessional, collaborative care of patients at risk for diseases and conditions related to the oral cavity.

Casey will present finding of international educational research she conducted with colleagues at the University of Manitoba which document the profound lack of oral health education in prelicensure education of physicians, nurses, and pharmacists. She will also present findings of other researchers in this area, along with the work of a number of educators who have attempted to integrate oral health into medical schools and residency programs. She will also present the vision for the novel curriculum (under development at the University of Manitoba) and how it differs from conventional and other online educational resources. Topics related to oral-systemic health that are perceived by the various nondental disciplines as most important, and obstacles to inclusion and other internal constraints to development and implementation of an oral health curriculum in undergraduate and graduate education in nondental disciplines are discussed. The presentation concludes by a brief debut of the multi-media components of the Oral-Systemic Health Education for Nondental Healthcare Providers and models for interprofessional education which has been created at the University of Manitoba, and those which are in progress.

After attending this course, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the adequacy of current curriculum relative to oral health in undergraduate education in various nondental disciplines.
  2. Discuss the impetus behind recommendations for curriculum reform which suggest inclusion of oral health in the education of nondental healthcare disciplines.
  3. Identify various obstacles that must be addressed to include oral health in curricula of undergraduate medicine, pharmacy and nursing.
  4. Identify topics in oral-systemic health that are perceived by medicine, pharmacy, and nursing to be the most important.
  5. Appreciate the vision for the specialized curriculum, Oral-Systemic Health Education for Nondental Healthcare Providers, and models for interprofessional education which have been created at the University of Manitoba.
  6. Consider ways to implement components of this novel curriculum into a university setting.

 

Oral Health Courses Particularly Relevant to Physicians, Nurses, and Allied Healthcare Professionals

The following courses have been customized for educating and training nondental healthcare providers (physicians, nurses, pharmacists, diabetes educators, dieticians, and other healthcare providers), about important aspects of oral health which are particularly relevant to their disciplines.

An Overview of Periodontal Diseases: Etiology, Clinical Presentation, Emerging Evidence of Periodontal-Systemic Links, & Practical Application for Nondental Healthcare Providers (6 hours)
Length of Program: 6 hours
Audience: Physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, diabetes educators, and other nondental healthcare providers
Pre-requisite knowledge or training: none

This course empowers nondental healthcare providers to become more proactive in addressing periodontal disease. It begins with an excellent, evidence-based synopsis of the biological cascade of events surrounding the progression from periodontal health to periodontal disease. Parameters of healthy tissue, and clinical manifestations of gingivitis, and the various stages of inflammatory periodontal diseases along with brief explanations of diagnostic parameters are presented. An overview of the emerging evidence of periodontal-systemic links is provided, along with well supported recommendations for practical application in the everyday clinical practices of nondental healthcare providers.

After attending this course, participants should be able to:

  1. Discuss with patients an abbreviated explanation of the etiology and pathogenesis of inflammatory periodontal diseases.
  2. Identify the clinical presentation of gingivitis and periodontitis.
  3. Assess a patient’s risk for periodontal diseases.
  4. Describe evidence that supports the biological plausibility of inflammation from periodontal disease increasing the risk for diseases/conditions such as coronary artery disease, stroke, complications of diabetes, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and aspiration pneumonia.
  5. Provide patient education about periodontal diseases.
  6. Implement procedures for periodontal disease screening and appropriate referral
  7. Reflect on the way we currently practice: Case study
The Systemic Impact of Periodontal Disease: The Important Role of Nondental Healthcare Providers in Screening, Referral, & Patient Education (3 hours)
Length of Program: 3 hours
Audience: Physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, diabetes educators, and other nondental healthcare providers
Pre-requisite knowledge or training: none

Emerging evidence suggests that there are interrelationships between periodontal disease and increased risk for various inflammatory driven disease states and conditions such as coronary artery diseases, stroke, aspiration pneumonia, and complications of diabetes and pregnancy. This provides a compelling rationale for a non-traditional role for physicians, nurses, and other nondental healthcare practitioners in screening, referral and educating patients who are at risk for periodontal disease. This course presents an abbreviated overview of the biological mechanisms implicated in various periodontal-systemic links, findings of recent meta-analyses and consensus reports, in addition to key patient education messages. The course concludes by offering practical ways to screen for periodontal disease, and appropriately refer at risk patients.

After attending this course, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the evidence that supports the biological plausibility of inflammation from periodontal disease increasing the risk for diseases/conditions such as coronary artery disease, stroke, complications of diabetes, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and aspiration pneumonia.
  2. Provide patient education about periodontal diseases.
  3. Implement procedures for periodontal disease screening and appropriate referral.
Re-Thinking the Importance of Periodontal Health in Prenatal Care (3 hours)
Length of Program: 3 hours
Audience: Physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, diabetes educators, and other nondental healthcare providers
Pre-requisite knowledge or training: none

Periodontal disease has been implicated in a number of complications of pregnancy including preterm birth, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, delivery of small-for-gestational age infancy, and even fetal loss. It has been estimated that about 40% of pregnant women have some form of periodontal infection; subsequently this body of evidence may have serious implications to the health of both the mother and infant. Healthcare providers who share the responsibility for the care of pregnant women, need to carefully evaluate the evidence which suggests that infection of periodontal origin may pose a risk to both the mother and the developing fetus during gestation and consider how this new knowledge base may or may not influence the way they care for patients.

After attending this course, participants should be able to:

  1. Discuss with patients an abbreviated explanation of the etiology and pathogenesis of inflammatory periodontal diseases.
  2. Discuss evidence supporting a relationship between periodontal disease and various adverse pregnancy outcomes.
  3. Accurately articulate the risk periodontal disease may pose to healthy pregnancy, and the potential for periodontal disease treatment to decrease this risk.
  4. Articulate the findings of various consensus opinions related to the importance of oral health in pregnancy.
  5. Provide appropriate education about periodontal diseases to women contemplating pregnancy, or to women who are already pregnant.
  6. Provide accurate counsel about the benefits of periodontal treatment to women who are pregnant.
  7. Implement procedures for periodontal disease screening and appropriate referral.
  8. Reflect on the way we currently practice: Case study